Friday, December 11, 2009

Whiskey and Oysters

An hour later Cocke stepped out back to use the privy and saw two mounted English soldiers, slowly walking their horses in the direction of the tavern. It was approaching sundown and in the slanting rays of ruddy light the soldiers looked to Cocke in his half-drunken state like some kind of demons. The red of their coats glowed like hot iron; the brass buttons on their turned-out cuffs and fronts caught the light and glittered, flashing over the riders’ arms and chests. Mounted on coal black horses and wearing broad black hats, the soldiers put to Cocke’s mind certain images of Hell he’d seen one afternoon when paging through Father Dowd’s catechism.

18 comments:

  1. Great last line. The mood of this is very nice too.

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  2. I'll pay you $24.95 right now Mr. Bailey to read what you've written so far of this book.

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  3. I'm into it and it's just a first draft!

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  4. Are you taking bribes to read the book, Mr. Bailey? Hehe, looks like Anne wants to pay you! I count myself lucky to have read your last book. This one sounds great! I like your new layout. :)

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  5. Davin: Thanks. A lot of this first draft is all about setting moods, I'm finding. Another idea I'm working with is using details of setting to show character; that is, not just what's in the scene, but what it means to the characters. The current chapter, for example, will be the same day shown three times in a row from three different perspectives, and each of the POV characters will interpret the same things differently. There is also a Proust joke, which makes the whole thing fun.

    Piedmont: Thanks, but you'll just have to wait! Almost nobody gets to read my first drafts, because I know how much work they'll need and how different the final version will be.

    Charlie: Thanks! Hopefully the book will hook people once it's actually finished.

    Michelle: I am not taking bribes. But I will say that I think this book will be better than my last one, and really different in a lot of fundamental ways. Is the new layout okay? All I did was widen the margins. Or that's all I tried to do, anyway!

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  6. The new layout is fine. I like the wider format. So do you want to trade this book with your other one to publish first. Would your agent do that?

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  7. Michelle: No, I want the Hamlet book published first, because I think it's a good book and I'd rather "Cocke & Bull" came after it and not the other way around.

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  8. Oh yeah, the whole each book getting better. Yep, I get that. :)

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  9. Of course, that means that whatever I write after "Cocke & Bull" has to be even better. No pressure, right? But book #3 will have sailing ships and penguins and icebergs and a grand ball with evening gowns and tuxedos and sled dogs and gosh who knows what else! Also, more whiskey!

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  10. I think if your first book is good and your second book is even better, then your fans will be willing to forgive a flop for the third. Just a hunch. Don't put too much pressure on yourself, especially not the Michael Jackson sort of pressure.

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  11. Somehow I can't see Scott doing the moonwalk.

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  12. LOL!!!!!!! It will be fun to meet each other in the future. The longer we wait the higher my expectations become. :P

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  13. Davin is correct. I can moonwalk. That's where the similarity to Michael Jackson ends, though. Mostly.

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  14. Very good to know, but I'm still having trouble imagining all this...

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  15. I guess I'm lucky. Scott sent me a video.

    Okay, that's a lie, and I apologize.

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  16. Davin actually saw the video on Hulu. I doubt his apology.

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