Monday, February 8, 2010

Because Stuff Like This Interests Me

Here is a graph of the chapter lengths (including projected-based-on-nothing-but-a-feeling final five unwritten chapters) for the first draft of "Cocke & Bull." What can we learn from this? Nothing. But it's cool.

10 comments:

  1. Hmmm...chapters 8 and 9...very interesting.

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  2. Big D: Chapters 4 through 12 all contain passages that are more sketch than prose and will likely grow longer during revisions. Some of the long chapters in the middle will likely grow shorter during revisions. The entire book will of course get longer during revisions, because that's what always happens.

    I do find it interesting that the chapters about which I knew the least when I began writing are ending up to be the longest ones in the first draft. What does that mean? No idea. Possibly that the more familiar I am with my material, the more apt I am to skim through the writing?

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  3. Scott, I'm probably the only other person reading your blog that gets a little fluttery looking at that chart. It's beautiful. Stuff like that makes me joyously happy, and I should do one for Monarch.

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  4. Ooo... I'm squidding out! I've hand drawn character appearance frequency graphs and various action graphs, but I've never figured out how to to graphs as pretty as this one. I MUST try this!

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  5. Squidding out? I'd never heard of that. I want to squid out!

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  6. I guess "squid" must be a film industry term or at least a regional term. I had no idea it wasn't commonplace.

    Squid \skwid\ n. 1: someone who is overly enthusiastic about a particular subject 2: someone holding excessive knowledge of a topic 3: a geek - i.e. a computer squid or a movie squid

    Squidding out \skwid-ding 'aut\ vb. 1: to become thrilled with 2: geeking out; also - to squid out

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  7. Lynette: It's just Excel. I also have a graph showing total wordcount over time. Things like this interest me and I adore graphs and charts (a geeky trait clearly shared by Glam). Jon Clinch (author of "Finn") says he tracked wordcount by time period in Excel for his latest novel, to make sure that each of the tree time periods was equally represented in the narrative. Or something like that.

    Big D: Can you squid out with a startfish brain?

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  8. By the way, this graph also makes it much easier for me to read your blog post at work.

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  9. Dr. Big D: From now on, I'll have a graph or scientific illustration in every post! Anything for you.

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