Friday, November 14, 2014

"Bailey's historiography is cheekily Shakespearean in its wholesale transformations of historical figures"

12 comments:

  1. It must be a thrill to have your wonderful novel included in a college course syllabus. Bravo!

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    1. It's pretty cool. Mostly, of course, it's nice that the book keeps finding readers. Professor Burstein is a smart reader, too; she mentions most of the character pairings and that pleases me a lot. One of the literary conceits of The Astrologer is that characters are presented in pairs, versions of each other.

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  2. That was good. So good I wish I'd written it and so good I'm glad I didn't try.

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    1. It's kind of discomfiting how Burstein shows that all of the irony in the book was created purely through mechanics, by doing little more than showing ideas in opposition.

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  3. Burstein! Yes! Going to go read right now--

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  4. Well, rather than being "discomfited," think of it this way: She is perhaps tailoring the presentation so that it is more readily accessible to literature students; sometimes, overstating the obvious rather than attempting to suggest the subtle is what is needed in classroom presentations. But, hey, I could be wrong. I do not presume to speak for her. It is simply an observation from a simple reader.

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  5. Prof. Burstein's undergraduates don't read her blog. She writes for grownups. Other literature PhDs, mostly. It seemed pretty subtle to me. Careful, is what I mean.

    "Mechanics" is the right metaphor. She knows how to dismantle many different kinds of engines.

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  6. I'm not complaining. I meant my comment as a compliment to Professor B.

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  7. Compliments to both of you. That was a very smart and clear assessment.

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  8. I particularly appreciate the link back to the Little Professor because she was one of the first literary blogs I read around a decade ago, when blogs were wonderfully young. I'd drifted away from her somehow, but now she's back on my regular reading list. Am hoping to read your book and Marly's latest over Christmas, time permitting...

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    1. I've read two of Marly's books: one novel and one epic poem. When I have time, I'm going to read more of both from her. I'm going to read one of your books very soon, too.

      The Little Professor is a great blog. Even if I'm not particularly interested in Victorian religious novels, I enjoy the way Burstein talks about literature, the way she pulls texts apart to see what's there.

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