Tuesday, November 25, 2014

“I never desire to converse with a man who has written more than he has read.”

That Samuel Johnson quote is being used as an excuse to buy more books, of course. Last week Mighty Reader and I took a turn or two through Trip Taylor Bookseller in beautiful Boise, and I don't know about Mighty Reader, but I unloaded $60 in exchange for about forty pounds of books:

Spring Snow Yukio Mishima (thanks, TSA, for ripping the cover when you searched through our luggage)
Modern Painters John Ruskin (this accounts for most of the weight, as it is all five volumes of MP in one book, on glossy paper with lots of illustrations and color plates, very nice indeed)
Selected Poems Robert Browning (in one of those tiny pocket-sized editions from the late 19th-century)
19-Century Russian Plays F.D. Reeve (editor and translator)
The Confidence Man Herman Melville (in a wild and wacky cover)

I was tempted by many other books there, including the usual assortment of fine editions of books we already own, but I showed admirable restraint as I bore in mind airline baggage weight limits. Mighty Reader picked up her own stack of Hemingway et al that I'm not listing because I respect her privacy.

I've already started reading Mr Ruskin, but the rest of these will have to fight their way to the tops of the already-high stacks of unread books at Aurora Manor.

Also! When we got back from Boise, I found a copy of Jeff Sypeck's The Tale of Charlemagne and Ralph the Collier waiting for me. It's in verse, what fun! I don't know when I'll read it. Possibly this coming weekend. It's short but, you know, it's in verse and there are footnotes.

6 comments:

  1. I am envious when anyone writes about their adventures in bookstores. Bookstores are for me a bit like an unattended butcher shop to a starving dog. And to my mind, if there is a Heaven, then perhaps it is a bookstore (or at least there must be bookstores there).

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    1. I'm hoping it's more library than bookstore, and I'll be able to read in all known languages. That would be pretty good.

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  2. I'm imagining you in front of a scale with some worker shoveling books into a big crate sitting on top of it.

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    1. That is so close to how it actually happened!

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  3. Thanks for snagging a copy of Ralph, Scott! On one hand, it's a Christmas poem; on the other hand, it's a Christmas poem with thoroughly un-modern sensibilities. But I hope you find it a jaunty little read. Happy Thanksgiving!

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    1. I'm just glad I live in a world where people translate Middle Scots poems into English. Happy Thanksgiving to you!

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