Thursday, November 5, 2015

The Plagiary

A few minutes ago I saw the word "plagiary" in the table of contents of a reference book. I first misread the word as "plag-iary," rhyming with "aviary," or "bestiary." I took it to mean a collection of plagiarisms. And then I remembered that there is no such word as "plagiary" meaning a bestiary of plagiarism, and I was disappointed.

10 comments:

  1. i thought it had something to do with a beach. what's the longest word in german? is it longer than the longest word in welsh?

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    1. You can create compound words in German as you like, mostly. I have no idea what the longest word is. When I was reading Reinhold Messner earlier this year, he would throw nouns together into long strings to surround concepts, and Gunter Grass does the same thing. Sometimes I get confused until I realize what's going on, that these "words" are just phrases with the prepositions and helping-verbs squeezed out.

      A BBC article I just found via Google says:
      The German language has lost its longest word thanks to a change in the law to conform with EU regulations. Rindfleischetikettierungsueberwachungsaufgabenuebertragungsgesetz - meaning "law delegating beef label monitoring" - was introduced in 1999 in the state of Mecklenburg-Western Pomerania. Jun 3, 2013

      Those crazy Teutons.

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    2. If you break it into its constituent words, you get:

      Rindfleische tiket tierungs ueberwachungs aufgaben uebertragungs gesetz

      Which means, in literal translation:

      beef ticket entrance security control tasks transfer law

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    3. my high school german(fifty+ yrs. ago)didn't cover that, although we did do faust in the original, most of it anyway. admiration for your perseverance in adhering to german crime novel month(i think that's what it was, maybe...). just finished a bio of alexander von humboldt-what a guy!

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  2. Hello, Mr. B! I come because Mary said Mona In The Desert is worth eating hats over and has no sections that should be included in a plagiary. I'm very excited because I trust that books will be sent and shared!

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    1. Dr M! I am so pleased that you are still with us. I should send you some photos from Paris, especially the bouquet-leaving at Proust's grave. Yes, a copy of the MS will find its way to you. I have a couple of things I need to do to the book first, because Mighty Reader is a mighty reader and very smart.

      There is some Shakespeare in Mona, but it's all credited to him.

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    2. I'm still around. I'm even still writing. I'd love to see the photos. It has been quite a year, Scott. So far, I've been to Australia, Korea, Japan, Hawaii, and I'm currently in Chile!

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    3. Yes, I see you're "high in the Chilean Andes today to celebrate groundbreaking." Very exciting! Give my regards to Magellan.

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  3. Perhaps you need a character who will take care of this matter of plagiary for you by keeping a commonplace book of the word crimes!

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    1. What a perfect solution! I've been rolling an idea around, a book about a professional translator, and she would certainly enjoy keeping such a book. By gum, that's really good. I will steal that idea, thanks!

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